National Cocoa Day

When:
December 13th, Every Year

Time: 12:00 am - 12:55 pm

Description

National Cocoa Day Chocolate and cocoa are produced using the beans of the cacao tree. The tree may have first originate from the foothills of the Andes Mountains close to the Amazon River and the Orinoco River in South America. The tree was conveyed to Central America by the antiquated Mayas, and was developed in Mexico by the Toltecs and later by the Aztecs.

Cocoa was an essential item in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. Individuals who recounted the account of the victory of Mexico by Hernán Cortés said that when Moctezuma II, ruler of the Aztecs, had supper he took no other beverage than chocolate, served in a brilliant challis and eaten with a brilliant spoon. Seasoned with vanilla and flavors, his chocolate was whipped into a foam that disintegrated in the mouth. No under 50 pitchers of the beverage were readied for the head every day, and 2000 more for nobles of his court.
National Cocoa Day

Chocolate was conveyed to Europe by the Spaniards and turned into a well known beverage by 1700. They additionally conveyed the cacao tree toward the West Indies and the Philippines. It was utilized as a part of catalytic procedures, where it was known as Black Bean.

The cacao plant was first given its name by Swedish characteristic researcher Carl von Linné (1707-1778), who called it "theobroma cacao" or "sustenance of the divine being